Ranger Rules Rule

Lt@14 Completes Ranger Training

Duke of Derm and Princess of Peds forwarded photos commemorating the completion of Army Ranger training1 by their son, Lt@14.2

Ranger training prepares Lt@14 to
defend against almost any risk

Especially hearty congratulations would seem the response on this occasion and are sincerely proffered. I continue to be deeply impressed by the intellectual and physical discipline and the courage Lt@14 has displayed since deciding to pursue a military career.3

I cannot, at the same time, help but be sobered and moved by the realization that the acknowledged reason for these efforts is to prepare my friends’ son, whom I have carried in my arms, to be an effective soldier when deliberately placed in harm’s way. This was brought home by a photo of the Ranger Creed displayed on the left pillar of the entrance to Ranger School.

The first two lines read4

Recognizing that I volunteered as a Ranger, fully knowing the hazards of my chosen profession, I will always endeavor to uphold the prestige, honor, and high esprit de corps of the Rangers.

Acknowledging the fact that a Ranger is a more elite soldier who arrives at the cutting edge of battle by land, sea, or air, I accept the fact that as a Ranger my country expects me to move farther, faster and fight harder than any other soldier.

The gung ho spirit embedded in those phrases takes on an altogether different, somber cast when one realizes those propositions now govern the life of someone beloved.

On the pillar opposite the Ranger Creed are the another set of phrases which are less dramatic and inspirational but, I contend, perhaps even more impressive than the Ranger Creed.

Robert Rogers and The Ranger Standing Orders

Major Robert Rogers is credited with establishing the first Ranger company. In 1756, he put together a group of deer hunters to fight alongside the British in the French and Indian War.

Rogers used and expanded upon the skills these men already had, “adapting them to the context of war and creating 28 operational rules that included advisements on ambushing, marching formations, prisoner interrogation, retreat, scouting and reconnaissance. These were documented in Rogers’ now-famous Standing Orders for Rangers, and 19 of the orders are in use for the 75th Ranger Regiment.”5

Robert Robers

The genius of Robert Rogers was not only that he made his orders sensible and direct but also that he assembled them into a set of rules that were cohesive, comprehensive, and applicable to all those in the military unit.

They have also withstood the test of time and have been so effective, that many of the operational standards are still in use by Rangers today.

Standing Orders: Rogers’ Rangers

  1. Don’t forget nothing.
  2. Have your musket clean as a whistle, hatchet scoured, 60 rounds powder and ball and be ready to march at a minute’s warning.
  3. When you’re on the march, act the way you would if you was sneaking up on a deer. See the enemy first.
  4. Tell the truth about what you see and what you do. There is an army depending on us for correct information. You can lie all you please when you tell other folks about the Rangers, but don’t never lie to a Ranger or officer.
  5. Don’t never take a chance you don’t have to.
  6. When we’re on the march, we march single file, far enough apart so one shot can’t go through two men.
  7. If we strike swamps or soft ground, we spread out abreast, so it’s hard to track us.
  8. When we march, we keep moving till dark, so as to give the enemy the least possible chance at us.
  9. When we camp, half the party stays awake while the other half sleeps.
  10. If we take prisoners, we keep ‘em separate till we have had time to examine them, so they can’t cook up a story between ‘em.
  11. Don’t ever march home the same way. Take a different route so you won’t be ambushed.
  12. No matter whether we travel in big parties or little ones, each party has to keep a scout 20 yards ahead, 20 yards on each flank and 20 yards in the rear, so the main body can’t be surprised and wiped out.
  13. Every night you’ll be told where to meet if surrounded by a superior force.
  14. Don’t sit down to eat without posting sentries.
  15. Don’t sleep beyond dawn. Dawn’s when the French and Indians attack.
  16. Don’t cross a river by a regular ford.
  17. If somebody’s trailing you, make a circle, come back onto your own tracks, and ambush the folks that aim to ambush you.
  18. Don’t stand up when the enemy’s coming against you. Kneel down, lie down, hide behind a tree.
  19. Let the enemy come till he’s almost close enough to touch. Then let him have it and jump out and finish him with your hatchet.

One notes that, with only minor adjustments, these rules could be effectively used not only to lead a fighting force but also to guide, say, a musician’s World Tour, a group of teachers dealing with an obstructive administrator, a medical department’s quest for survival within the jungle of a university medical school, or an individual’s adventures in Internet dating.6

Credit Due Department
The photos used in this post, with the exception of the portrait of Robert Rogers, were taken by either Duke of Derm or Princess of Peds.


  1. My working hypothesis is that the helicopter dangling those four individuals was a demonstration of newly learned Ranger skills although I can’t quite shake the suspicion that it could be a United Airlines-funded trial of alternative solutions for overbooked flights. []
  2. Lt@14 is also the brother of Very Very Good Girl and the soon to be brother-in-law of SportsBizPro. []
  3. See Hooah! Opportunity for account of his graduation from West Point []
  4. The complete Ranger Creed follows:

    Recognizing that I volunteered as a Ranger, fully knowing the hazards of my chosen profession, I will always endeavor to uphold the prestige, honor, and high esprit de corps of the Rangers.

    Acknowledging the fact that a Ranger is a more elite soldier who arrives at the cutting edge of battle by land, sea, or air, I accept the fact that as a Ranger my country expects me to move farther, faster and fight harder than any other soldier.

    Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be, one-hundred-percent and then some.

    Gallantly will I show the world that I am a specially selected and well-trained soldier. My courtesy to superior officers, neatness of dress and care of equipment shall set the example for others to follow.

    Energetically will I meet the enemies of my country. I shall defeat them on the field of battle for I am better trained and will fight with all my might. Surrender is not a Ranger word. I will never leave a fallen comrade to fall into the hands of the enemy and under no circumstances will I ever embarrass my country.

    Readily will I display the intestinal fortitude required to fight on to the Ranger objective and complete the mission though I be the lone survivor.

    Rangers Lead The Way! []

  5. See U.S. Army Ranger Association []
  6. Heck, just that one with the hatchet could have resolved a batch of problems that troubled me in the past. []

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